BARBARA BROWN KIMBROUGH EXHIBIT HALL

Aubree Karner has been a Broken Arrow resident her whole life. She attended Broken Arrow Public Schools and graduated from high school in 2004. From there, she attended the University of Arkansas where she received a Bachelor's of Fine Arts in Studio Art with an emphasis in Drawing. After working for Philbrook Museum of Art as a teaching assistant for several years during and after college, she decided to attend graduate school at the University of Tulsa where she obtained her Master's degree in Museum Science and Management. Upon graduating in 2012 she found work teaching high school art at North Intermediate High School and then Broken Arrow High School. While working full time, Aubree found she was no longer making art for herself, only examples and demonstrations for her students. She missed the creative outlet and found a way to renew her practice by quitting her full-time job and working part-time at Gilcrease Museum as an Education Assistant. Since then she has made art-making a central part of her life, creating and selling art whenever possible. She has exhibited her work in various shows around the country and locally, including at the Dennis R. Neill Equality Center and the Broken Arrow Historical Museum. Her work can be seen on several murals in Tulsa and surrounding areas and on Facebook and Instagram. She currently teaches part-time at Tulsa School of Arts and Sciences and lives in Broken Arrow with her husband and two dogs. 

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THE LEGACY OF

BARBARA BROWN KIMBROUGH

Anyone fortunate enough to have known Barbara knew that she was a fountain of energy, vision, and positivity. She was “all in” when it came to developing the plans for our history museum back in 2003, and she was always present in planning and vision development meetings for downtown revitalization. She served on the city-chamber seminal committee that was the grass roots of re-creating our downtown into Broken Arrow’s beautiful Rose District.

Barbara encouraged both city leaders and history volunteers and sought out ways to make a difference with her quiet, personal contacts, usually after meetings, always moving “behind the scenes”. Her passion stemmed from her love of history, the arts, and the city. That love was a family trait that began over a century ago.